Act as a Personal Building Block

The Jewish concept of a positive mitzvot or G-dly act relates to physical action. From the perspective of an integrated spiritual consciousness, the mitzvot is a physical act in the physical world that reverberates into the spiritual world. A positive mitzvot has the power to be a physical action that transforms into an emanating spiritual relationship with the “other.” This creates a positive and cohesive relationship between the two spiritual objects. This creates a new pattern, a new algorithm, a new creation. This creates the foundation for spiritual transformation.

 

Therefore, when you look at the Hillel foundation of the Torah, the integrated relationship to a oneness world, you must “love thy neighbor as thyself” and “love G-d with all your heart and soul.” These are actions in the day to day world. The actions themselves are a type of rebellion to the world of automation. They are freeing.

 

The performance of the acts of “love thy neighbor as thyself” allows one to physically create a type of memory  in the world of day to day life. The memory is that I loved the other. The action itself resonates in the heart and creates a spiritual light that connects to the person that the act was performed for. In other words, the neighbor cannot help but connect to acts of love. These line of connection has a type of permanence that remains between the actor and the object of that action. The connection remains in the world of the spiritual and remains forever as a part of the character of both.

 

In the world of emanation, this relationship creates a new type of creature, a type of algorithm that will happen again and again. The performance of more of these “love thy neighbor acts” will begin to reverberate into the world of creation. A creation of a G-dly pattern will begin to manifest in the physical and spiritual world.

2 thoughts on “Act as a Personal Building Block

  1. Pingback: 16 April 2018 Rosh Hashanah morning | Kabbalic Concepts

  2. Pingback: The Three Foundation Hebraic Feasts | Kabbalic Concepts

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